Rewarding Restoration

Rewarding Landowners for Stewarding the Natural Resources under Their Care

California’s natural systems have been significantly altered by human activity for more than a century. This includes building dams that drown landscapes and disrupt fish migration, pumping limited water supplies to satisfy the thirst of ever-expanding cities, and converting forests and other wildlands to farmland and urban zones.

California’s rivers and streams, which have supported some of the cleanest water and healthiest fish populations anywhere in the nation, are among the most impacted of these natural systems. Today, more than 80% of the state’s nearly 200,000 miles of monitored streams fail clean-water standards. Over 60% of all native fish are extinct, endangered or declining. Salmon, once an icon of the state’s abundant natural wealth, have nearly vanished.

While not the only factor, the clearing of trees and other vegetation along waterways to make room for crops and livestock has heightened the problem. Without these natural buffers — 90% of which have disappeared statewide over the last century — sediment and polluted runoff escape unchecked into streams that people and wildlife depend on for survival.

Cultivating Clean Water, Fish Habitat

Without vegetation to hold it back, sediment from farms and other private lands can escape into nearby waterways, harming water quality and fish habitat (top). Planting trees and other types of vegetation along rivers and streams keeps soil in place, water clean and aquatic wildlife healthy.

Without vegetation to hold it back, sediment from farms and other private lands can escape into nearby waterways, harming water quality and fish habitat (top). Planting trees and other types of vegetation along rivers and streams keeps soil in place, water clean and aquatic wildlife healthy.

California landowners who manage their properties responsibly provide important services — such as clean drinking and irrigation water purified by wetlands, and bountiful fish populations living in intact rivers — that benefit nature and human well-being.

Through our Ecosystem Services project, Sustainable Conservation wants to reward — in real dollars — farmers, ranchers and other landowners for restoring and sustainably managing the natural resources under their care. Incentivizing sound land stewardship increases the amount and overall impact of restoration — and at a fraction of the cost of other methods such as increased regulation and buying land outright.

Engaging these individuals is of vital importance. More than 50% of California is privately owned — and a vast majority of California’s rivers and streams flow through or along private property.

Sustainable Conservation’s project represents a new approach for improving the long-term health of California’s environment while strengthening the economic security of conservation-minded landowners and their communities.

Sustainable Conservation is developing uniform standards for measuring the environmental outcomes of restoration activities, as well as a payment mechanism to reward landowners for managing their properties in ways that benefit people and the environment. We are simultaneously engaging the beneficiaries of these quantified outcomes (such as public utilities and water users) to seek their investment in the actions of participating landowners.

Highlights

Partners

California Roundtable on Agriculture and the Environment

Ag Innovations

Stillwater Sciences

East Bay Municipal Utility District

EDF

Lodi Winegrape Commission

San Joaquin Country Resource Conservation District

Natural Resources Conservation Service

Point Blue

From our blog

Reconnecting Fish to Historic Habitat

Location: Quiota Creek, Santa Barbara County Project: Fish passage improvement Restorationist: Tim Robinson, Ph.D., Senior Resources Scientist and Fisheries Division Manager, Cachuma Operation and Maintenance Board Endangered Southern California steelhead are getting a big boost thanks to Tim Robinson, who’s working with his colleagues in the Santa Ynez Watershed in Santa Barbara to restore access…

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Pescadero Floodplain Revitalized

Location: Butano Creek, San Mateo County Project: Floodplain restoration Restorationist: Kellyx Nelson, Executive Director of San Mateo County Resource Conservation District and Sustainable Conservation partner Pescadero is home to a tiny and vibrant farming community that’s also dedicated to preserving its natural environment. When Kellyx Nelson, Executive Director of the San Mateo Resource Conservation District, saw…

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Bringing Back What Was Once Lost

Sustainable Conservation is dedicated to making it easier to restore California. Working to balance the needs of humans and habitat is a key priority to ensure resource resiliency for a bright future. One way we can help is by easing the time and cost of restoration permitting while maintaining strict environmental standards. We’re working with state…

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